Seminar Series

Evolutionary Anthropology Talk Series (EATS)

EATS is the Evolutionary Anthropology department's weekly seminar. We host a mix of external faculty and student invited speakers, and also showcase the work of our own students and faculty. Check out previous EATS talks here!

Location: 013 Bio Sci
Time: 11:45 am–12:45 pm

Friday, March 31 - 11:45 AM – Dr. Herman Pontzer
The Crown Joules: Energetics, Ecology, and Evolution in Humans and other Primate
Biological Sciences 013
Dr. Herman Pontzer will present on topic: The Crown Joules: Energetics, Ecology, and Evolution in Humans and other Primate. See you there!

Friday, April 7 - 11:45 AM – Grabriel Yapuncich
Evolutionary Anthropology Talk Series
Biological Sciences 013
Evolutionary Anthropology graduate student (Gabriel Yapuncich) will be presenting

Friday, April 14 - 11:45 AM – Lydia Greene
Evolutionary Anthropology Talk Series
Biological Sciences 013
Evolutionary Anthropology graduate student (Lydia Greene) will be presenting

Friday, March 24 - 11:45 AM – Joseph Feldblum
Evolutionary Anthropology Talk Series
Biological Sciences 013
Evolutionary Anthropology graduate student (Joseph Feldblum) will be presenting

Friday, March 17 - 11:45 AM – TBA
Evolutionary Anthropology Talk Series
Biological Sciences 013
A weekly seminar series featuring leading researchers in the field as well as research updates from our faculty and graduate students. Attending these seminars will give you the opportunity to get greater insight into the research of faculty members and is a great chance to interact on a more personal level with all members of the department.

Friday, March 10 - 11:45 AM – Dr. Jason Kamilar
Climatic and Anthropogenic Effects on African Mammal Macroecology
Biological Sciences 013
Dr. Jason Kamilar (University of Massachusetts Amherst) will present on topic: Climatic and Anthropogenic Effects on African Mammal Macroecology. See you there

Friday, March 3 - 11:45 AM – Dr. Brenna Henn
Clarifying the Disputed Role of FOXP2 in Human Evolution
Biological Sciences 013
Visiting Seminar Speaker (Dr. Brenna Henn) will present on the topic: Clarifying the Disputed Role of FOXP2 in Human Evolution

Spring 2015

January 9 – Gabe Yapuncich, EVANTH Grad Student, Duke
Allometry of Articular Surfaces in the Primate Ankle

January 16 – Dr. Nate Dominy, Associate Professor, Dartmouth Anthropology
Evolution of the Human Pygmy Phenotype

January 30 – Noah Snyder-Mackler, EVANTH Postdoc, Duke
Chronic Social Stress and the Genome

February 6 – Dr. Julie Teichroeb, EVANTH Visiting Assistant Professor, Duke
The Role of Competition on Individual Routing Decisions: Lessons from Foraging Experiments on Wild Vervets​

February 13 – Angel Zeininger, EVANTH Postdoctoral Associate, Duke
Development of Heel-strike in Humans and African apes: Implications for Reconstructing Foot Posture in Fossil Hominins

February 20 – Dr. Rob Boyd, Professor, Arizona State Anthropology
TBD

February 27 – Dr. Andreas Koenig, Professor, SUNY-Stony Brook Anthropology
Agonism and dominance hierarchies among female primates: implications for socio-ecological models

March 6 – Caroline Rusk, EVANTH Grad Student, Duke
TBD

March 20 – Kara Walker, EVANTH Grad Student, Duke
TBD

April 3 – Beth Shapiro, Associate Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Santa Cruz
TBD

Fall 2014

September 5 – Chris Krupenye, EVANTH Grad Student, Duke
Triadic Awareness and its Benefits in Wild Chimpanzees

September 12 – Joseph Feldblum, EVANTH Grad Student, Duke
Male Chimpanzee Aggression and Affiliation in Gombe National Park

September 19 – Dr. Tom Rein, Tubingen
The Anthropoid Primate Ulna and Suspensory Locomotion

October 3 – Dr. Greg Wray, Professor, Biology, Duke
Evolving A Large Brain: Not so Easy

October 17 – Dr. Michael Muehlenbein, Assistant Professor, Anthropology, Indiana University
Primate Tourism

October 24 – Dr. Michael Wilson, Associate Professor, Anthropology, University of Minnesota
What Can Studies of Chimpanzees Tell Us About Human Warfare?

October 31 – Chase Nunez, UPE, Grad Student, Duke
Offspring of Primiparous Mothers Do Not Experience Higher Mortality or Poorer Growth: Revisiting the Conventional Wisdom with Archival Records of Rhesus Macaques

November 7 – Dr. Callum Ross, Professor, Organismal Biology and Anatomy, University of Chicago
TBD

November 14 – Dr. Luis Barreiro, Assistant Professor, University of Montreal
Decoding the Evolutionary History of African Rainforest Hunter-Gatherers and Agriculturalist Populations

November 21 – Dr. Athena Aktipis, Director, University of California-San Francisco
From Human sharing to Multicellularity: The Evolution of Resource Transfers and Economic Cheating

December 5 – Dr. Bert Covert, Professor, Dept of Anthropology, University of Colorado,br /> Conservation Planning for the Indochinese Silvered Langur in Southwestern Vietnam

December 12 – Dr. Rich Kay, EVANTH Professor, Duke
Biogeography in deep time – What do Phylogenetics, Geology, and Paleoclimate Tell Us About Early Platyrrhine Evolution?

Spring 2014

Fall 2013

August 30 – India Schneider-Crease, EVANTH Grad Student, Duke
Drivers of Parasite Infection in Theropithecus

September 6 – Thomas Gillespie, Associate Professor, Emory University
Health and the Future of the Gombe Chimpanzees: Eco-Epidemiology of Zoonotic Disease

September 20 – Dr. Daniel Schmitt, Professor & Gross Anatomy Course Professor, Duke
Screeching to a Halt (safely) in the Trees: Deceleration Drives Body Shape in Primates

September 27 – Dr. Christine Drea, Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke
Making Mean Mammals: A "Meerkat Mannor" Miniseries

October 4 – Dr. Christopher Kirk, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of Texas
Ears and Eyes in Primate Evolution

October 18 – Emily Boehm, EVANTH Grad Student, Duke

October 25 – Dr. PJ Perry, Assistant Professor, Penn State
Conservation and extinction genomics of Malagasy lemurs: anthropogenic effects

November 1 – Dr. Kenneth Glander, Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke
The Secret Life of Lemurs

November 8 – Dr. Derek Wildman, Associate Professor of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Wayne State University
Molecular Phylogeny and the Evolution of Primate Phenotypes

November 15 – Sarah Zohdy, Post-Doctoral Researcher, Emory University

November 22 – Bill Sanders, University of Michigan

December 6 – Dr. Peter Ellison, Professor of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University
Brains, Birth, and Human Reproductive Ecology

December 13 – Dr. Dorothy Cheney, Professor, University of Pennsylvania
How to win friends and influence fitness: Lessons from female baboons

Spring 2013

January 18 – Michael Granatosky, EVANTH Grad Student, Duke
Gait mechanics of inverted walking: implications for the evolution of suspensory locomotion

January 25 – Jingzhi Tan, EVANTH Grad Student, Duke
Do bonobos yawn with strangers?

February 8 – Susan Anton, Professor of Anthropology, New York University
The origin and evolution of early Homo: from bones to behavior

February 22 – Laurie Santos, Associate Professor of Psychology, Yale University
"The evolutionary origins of sharing minds: some hints and new questions from monkeys"
(co-sponsored with the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences)

March 8 – Susanne Shultz, Royal Society University Research Fellow, University of Manchester
Primate social and cognitive evolution: bringing the past to life with phylogenetic inference

March 15 – Thierry Smith, Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences
Early Eocene primate fossils and biogeography

March 22 – Jessica Rothman, Assistant Professor, Hunter College-CUNY
Nutritional balancing acts: new insights into the feeding ecology of African primates

April 5 – Chris Krupenye, EVANTH Grad Student, Duke
Ape social awareness and the evolution of intelligence

April 18 – Monique Borgerhoff Mulder, Professor of Anthropology, University of California-Davis
Responding to inequality: the erosion of cooperation and kinship in Mpimbwe
(co-sponsored with the Duke Population Research Institute)

April 26 – Amanda Lea, Duke University Program in Ecology Grad Student
Long-term effects of early experience in a wild primate

May 3 – Emily Boehm, EVANTH Grad Student, Duke
Sexual receptivity outside the fertile window: reproductive strategies in wild female chimpanzees

May 10 – Tom Struhsaker, Adjunct Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke
Social relations between species: the pros and cons

Fall 2012

September 14 – Noah Snyder-Mackler, EVANTH Postdoc, Duke
Kinship in the multi-level society of geladas

September 21 – Aaron Sandel, Grad Student, University of Michigan Anthropology
Questioning the social brain hypothesis: taking intraspecific variation into account in a phylogenetic comparative analysis

September 28 – Erik Seiffert, Associate Professor of Anatomical Sciences, SUNY-Stony Brook
Rethinking early primate evolution in Afro-Arabia

October 5 – Doug Boyer, Assistant Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke
How ankle bones reveal that early primates were slow

October 19 – Ken Glander, Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke
Are we looking for light in all the wrong places? The role of color vision in primates

October 26 – Denise Su, Curator, Cleveland Museum of Natural History
From bones to habitats: reconstructing the paleoecology of early hominins

November 8 – Eduardo Fernandez-Duque, Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania
Till death (or an intruder) do us part: intense intra-sexual competition and aggression in sexually monomorphic owl monkeys of Argentina

November 9 – Claudia Valeggia, Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania
The endocrinology of life-history transitions among the Toba of Argentina

November 16 – Maxx Toler, EVATH Grad Student, Duke
The kinetics of gnawing and the energetics of feeding on structurally defended foods

November 30 – Marisa Macias, EVANTH Grad Student, Duke
Size, shape, and time in the primate upper limb

December 7 – Chet Sherwood, Associate Professor of Anthropology, George Washington University
Evolution of the neocortex in apes and humans
(co-sponsored with the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences)

December 14 – Kari Allen, EVANTH Grad Student, Duke
Scaling and phylogenetic properties of brain shape in primates