Jingzhi Tan
  • Jingzhi Tan

  • Postdoctoral Associate
  • Evolutionary Anthropology
  • 004A Biological Sciences Building
  • Phone: (919) 660-7294
  • Fax: 919-660-7348
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Overview

    Humans are incredibly skillful in working with others. We cooperate in large-scale for a long term with unfamiliar strangers even in a costly way. However, how human cooperation evolved remains a mystery. Are we ultra-cooperators because we evolved to be genuinely altruistic to others or because we became more trusting to strangers? I study the psychological mechanisms of cooperation and trust in humans, nonhuman primates and dogs. I take a comparative approach to examine what are unique (and not unique) in human cooperation and how these traits evolved.
  • Bio

    I obtained my B.S. of Life Sciences in Peking University, China, 2008, with a minor of Psychology. I am interested in the origin of human cooperation, in particular the cognitive and biological underpinnings. I am also a keen conservationist. Taken together, I try to take an evolutionary perspective to understand what makes human successful/unsuccessful in cooperation to solve large-scale problems such as wildlife conservation.
  • Specialties

    • Cognitive Evolution
    • Behavioral Ecology and Physiology
  • Research Summary

    Cognition and behavior
  • Research Description

    Humans are incredibly skillful in working with others. We cooperate in large-scale for a long term with unfamiliar strangers even in a costly way. However, how human cooperation evolved remains a mystery. Are we ultra-cooperators because we evolved to be genuinely altruistic to others or because we became more trusting to strangers? I study the psychological mechanisms of cooperation and trust in humans, nonhuman primates and dogs. I take a comparative approach to examine what are unique (and not unique) in human cooperation and how these traits evolved.
  • Current Projects

    Xenophilia in bonobos, Other-regarding preferences in bonobos, Xenophobia in humans, Trust formation in domestic dogs
  • Areas of Interest

    Prosocial behavior
    Xenophobia
    Cognitive evolution
  • Education

      • B.S.,
      • Life Sciences,
      • Peking University, Beijing, China,
      • 2008
  • Search Publications
  • Teaching

    • EVANTH 260K.01
      • COGNITIVE EVOLUTION
      • DKU Conf 1095
      • MTuWTh 12:30 PM-01:45 PM
    • EVANTH 560SK.01
      • EVOLUTION, COGNITION & SOCIETY
      • DKU Conf 1103
      • MTuWTh 04:00 PM-05:15 PM