Chair

Director of Undergraduate Studies

    • Leslie J. Digby
    • Associate Professor of the Practice and DUS
    • My research has centered on the evolution primate social and reproductive behavior (including female-female competition) for many years. Working with marmosets and lemurs, I've investigated the evolution of infanticide, mating systems and cooperative breeding. In the last few years I've also begun to study more ecological aspects of behavior, in particular ...
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Director of Graduate Studies

    • Richard F. Kay
    • Professor and Director of Graduate Studies
    • I have several areas of research. The first encompasses the evolution of primates and mammalian faunal evolution, especially in South America. I also have written extensively on the subject of the evolutionary origins of the Anthropoidea (monkeys and apes). More generally, I am interested in the use of primate anatomy to reconstruct the phylogenetic history ...
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Assistant to Director of Graduate Studies

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    • M Lisa Squires
    • Staff Assistant and Assistant to the Chair and the DGS
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Faculty

Primary

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    • Leslie J. Digby
    • Associate Professor of the Practice and DUS
    • My research has centered on the evolution primate social and reproductive behavior (including female-female competition) for many years. Working with marmosets and lemurs, I've investigated the evolution of infanticide, mating systems and cooperative breeding. In the last few years I've also begun to study more ecological aspects of behavior, in particular ...
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    • Christine Drea
    • Professor
    • I have two broad research interests, sexual differentiation and social behavior, both focused on hyenas and primates. I am particularly interested in unusual species in which the females display a suite of masculinized characteristics, including male- like or exaggerated external genitalia and social dominance. The study of naturally occurring ...
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    • Ken Glander
    • Professor
    • My research focuses on the primate diet with four key objectives: 1) identifying what is selected from what is available and the chemical explanations for the selection; 2) characterize the behavioral and physiological adaptations of wild primates in response to their changing environmental conditions; 3) illuminating the interaction between diet ...
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    • Richard F. Kay
    • Professor and Director of Graduate Studies
    • I have several areas of research. The first encompasses the evolution of primates and mammalian faunal evolution, especially in South America. I also have written extensively on the subject of the evolutionary origins of the Anthropoidea (monkeys and apes). More generally, I am interested in the use of primate anatomy to reconstruct the phylogenetic history ...
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    • Charles L Nunn
    • Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology and Duke Global Health Institute
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    • Daniel O Schmitt
    • Professor
    • My primary interest is in the evolution of primate locomotion. I am interested in understanding the selective factors that govern limb design, gait choice, and locomotor mechanics. I am studying the mechanics of movement in primates and other vertebrates in the laboratory to understand the relationship between movement and postcranial morphology, ...
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    • Christine Wall
    • Associate Research Professor
    • The major goal of my work is to contribute to our understanding of the functional and evolutionary anatomy of the head, with an emphasis on how the feeding apparatus works and how it influences and is influenced by other structures and functions. My research focuses primarily on the functional anatomy of extant and extinct primates, but I am also interested ...
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    • Blythe A. Williams
    • Associate Professor of the Practice
    • I'm interested in the evolutionary relationships and ecological adaptations of primates, with particular focus on the initial diversification of the order Primates, the origin of the Anthropoidea, and the early hominoid radiation. I am also interested in the effects of climate change on the evolution of primates.
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Secondary

    • Elizabeth M. Brannon
    • Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience and Evolutionary Anthropology
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    • Claude T. Moorman III
    • Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Professor of Surgery
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    • Barry S. Myers
    • M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A., Professor of Biomedical Engineering, with appointments in Surgery, Business, and Anatomy and M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A., Senior Associate Dean for Industrial Partnerships and Research Commercialization, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, with appointments in Surgery, Business, and Anatomy, Director of the Center for Entre
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    • V. Louise Roth
    • Associate Professor of Biology and Evolutionary Anthropology
    • In addition to conceptual work on the biological bases of homology, variation, and parallel evolution, my research has focused on evolutionary changes in size and shape in mammals: the functional consequences of these changes, and the evolutionary modifications of ontogenetic processes that produce them. This work makes use of DNA sequences, ...
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    • Kathleen K Smith
    • Professor
    • I am interested in the functional and evolutionary morphology of vertebrates. My research has included the functional and phylogenetic significance of variations in form of craniofacial structures in squamate reptiles and mammals, the biomechanics of a class of structures called musculohydrostats, and the roles of adaptive evolution and constraint ...
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    • Andrea B Taylor
    • Associate Professor of Doctor of Physical Therapy Division, CFM and Evolutionary Anthropology
    • I am primarily interested in the evolution of feeding system morphology in primates. One major component of my research involves the study of jaw-muscle fiber architecture and physiology. Work in my lab largely involves comparative morphometric analyses of skull and jaw-muscle morphology. I collaborate with experimental biologists to incorporate ...
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    • Gregory A Wray
    • Professor of Biology and Evolutionary Anthropology and Director, Center for Evolutionary Genomics
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    • Anne D. Yoder
    • Professor, Biology
    • My primary research focus is the phylogenetics and evolution of Madagascar's lemurs. This has also inspired a broader interest in the biogeography of Madagascar, especially its modern terrestrial vertebrates. Given that Madagascar's natural habatitats are under extreme human pressures, I am also involved with conservation projects, especially those that involve ...
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Adjunct

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    • Juliann E Horvath Roth
    • Adjunct Assistant Professor
    • As the Research Director of the newly formed Primate Genomics Initiative, I am interested in combining primate genomics with research in other disciplines. I am currently involved in a collaborative project exploring the genetic basis for the evolution of human diet. I am also collaborating on a project to create a primate SNP resource.
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    • Alexandre Steenhuyse
    • Adjunct Assistant Professor and Paleolithic Archaeologist
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Emeritus

    • Matt Cartmill
    • Professor Emeritus
    • My current laboratory research (with Lemelin and Schmitt) focuses on the analysis of mammalian gaits. We are engaged in testing the conjecture that the phase relationships between fore and hind limb cycles in quadrupeds can be explained and predicted as a mathematical function of the contact times of the fore or hind limbs. A paper setting out this ...
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    • William L. Hylander
    • Professor Emeritus
    • My current research interests are related to the functional and evolutionary significance of craniofacial form in human and non-human primates, as well as in African bovids. The long-range goal of my research is to gain a better functional understanding of the morphological diversity of the mammalian craniofacial region. As the mammalian face is dominated by the ...
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    • Elwyn L Simons
    • James B Duke Professor Emeritus and Scientific Director, Duke University Primate Center
    • Dr. Elwyn L. Simons is primarily interested in the history, general biology, and behavior of living and extinct primates. His primary research concerns focus on the early evolution of anthropoids in the late Eocene and early Oligocene of the Fayum Depression, Egypt; the paleoecology, dating, taphonomy, anatomy, and relationships of extinct placentals from these ...
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Gross Anatomy

Senior Research Staff

Primary

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    • Ian C Gilby
    • Senior Research Scientist
    • Specific projects include food sharing, hunting, social relationships, dominance strategies.
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    • Jingzhi Tan
    • Postdoctoral Associate
    • Humans are incredibly skillful in working with others. We cooperate in large-scale for a long term with unfamiliar strangers even in a costly way. However, how human cooperation evolved remains a mystery. Are we ultra-cooperators because we evolved to be genuinely altruistic to others or because we became more trusting to strangers? I study the psychological mechanisms of cooperation and trust in humans, nonhuman primates and dogs. I take a comparative approach to examine what are ...
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    • Vanessa R Woods
    • Research Scientist
    • Studying the comparitive psychology of bonobos and chimpanzees. Particular interests are cooperation, xenophobia, and the development of socio-sexual behaviour in bonobos.
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Gross Anatomy

Lab Staff

Primary

Gross Anatomy

Associate in Research

Non-Duke Student/Intern

Administrative Staff

Business Manager

Staff Assistant

Other

Graduate Students

Primary

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    • Joseph T Feldblum
    • Graduate Student
    • My research interests include sexual selection, cooperation, demographic influences on behavior, and rank attainment in primates.
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    • Kathleen E. Grogan
    • Doctoral Student of Environmental Sciences and Policy and Graduate Assistant of Evolutionary Anthropology
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    • Nichelle D. Reed
    • Graduate Assistant
    • I'm working with Dr. Steve Churchill on fossil hominin material in relation to the functional morphology of locomotion and reconstructing phylogeny.
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    • India A. Schneider-Crease
    • Graduate Student
    • My research focuses on the physiological, behavioral, and environmental drivers of infection in wild primate populations. In particular, I study how intrinsic host characteristics shape patterns of infection and drive disease from the tapeworm Taenia serialis in geladas (Theropithecus gelada).
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Other

    • Amanda J. Lea
    • Doctoral Student of Environmental Sciences and Policy and Graduate Student of Evolutionary Anthropology
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    • Kendra N. Smyth
    • Doctoral Student of Environmental Sciences and Policy and Graduate Student of Evolutionary Anthropology
    • Neuro-endocrine and behavioral mechanisms of female dominance and reproductive skew in wild meerkats, Suricata suricatta  Ecological immunology: the causes and consequences of investment in immune function; trade-offs between reproductive effort and immune function
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