Kenneth Earl Glander

Kenneth Earl Glander

Professor Emeritus of Evolutionary Anthropology

External address: 
130 Science Dr., 108 Bio Sci Bldg, Durham, NC 27708
Internal office address: 
Duke Box 90383, Durham, NC 27708
Phone: 
(919) 699-2995

Overview

Primate ecology and social organization: the interaction between feeding patterns and social structure; evolutionary development of optimal group size and composition; factors affecting short and long-term demographic changes in stable groups; primate use of regenerating forests.

Degrees & Credentials

  • Ph.D., University of Chicago 1975

  • M.A., University of Chicago 1971

  • B.A., University of Texas at Austin 1969

Selected Grants

Energetic Costs of Feeding in Primates awarded by National Science Foundation (Senior Investigator). 2011 to 2016

Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant: Foraging Ecology of Delacour's Langurs in a Harsh Environment awarded by National Science Foundation (Principal Investigator). 2007 to 2008

Doctoral Dissertation Improvement: The Role of Female Mate Choice in Mantled Howling Monkey Reproduction awarded by National Science Foundation (Principal Investigator). 2006 to 2008

(97-0146) Social Relationships in Free-ranging Adult Red-fronted Brown Lemurs (Eulemur fulvus rufus) awarded by National Science Foundation (Principal Investigator). 1997 to 1999

(98-0567) Support of the Duke Center for the Study of Primate Biology and History awarded by National Science Foundation (Principal Investigator). 1996 to 1999

(97-0432) Support of the Duke Center for the Study of Primate Biology and History awarded by National Science Foundation (Principal Investigator). 1996 to 1998

(93-0776) Outdoor Run Renovation of the Duke University Primate Center awarded by National Science Foundation (Principal Investigator). 1993 to 1997

(95-0782) Support of the Duke Center for the Study of Primate Biology and History awarded by National Science Foundation (Principal Investigator). 1996 to 1997

(95-0809) The Ecological Influences on Activity Cycle in Two Cathemeral Lemurid Primates, Eulemur mongoz (Mongoose lemur awarded by National Science Foundation (Principal Investigator). 1996 to 1997

(95-0440) Continuing Support of the Duke University Center for the Study of Primate Biology and History awarded by National Science Foundation (Co-Principal Investigator). 1993 to 1996

Pages

Glander, K. E. “Average Body Weight for Mantled Howling Monkeys (Alouatta palliata): An Assessment of Average Values and Variability.” New Perspectives in the Study of Mesoamerican Primates, edited by Alejandro Estrada et al., Springer, 2006.

Teaford, Mark F., Alejandro, and K. E. Glander. “Dental microwear and diet in a wild population of mantled howlers (Alouatta palliata).” Adaptive Radiations of Neotropical Primates, edited by Marilyn Ann Norconk et al., Springer, 1996, pp. 433–99.

Glander, K. E. “Nonhuman primate self-medication with wild plant foods.” Eating On The Wild Side: The Pharmacologic, Ecologic, and Social Implications Of Using Noncultigens, edited by K. E. Etkin, Nina, University of Arizona Press, 1994, pp. 227–39. Open Access Copy

Glander, K. E. “Selecting and processing food.” The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Human Evolution, edited by K. E. Jones, S et al., Cambridge University Press, 1993, pp. 65–68. Open Access Copy

Glander, K. E. “Capture and marking techniques for arboreal primates.” Estudios Primatalogicos En Mexico, edited by K. E. Estrada, A. et al., Universidad Veracruzana, 1993, pp. 299–304. Open Access Copy

Neville, Melvia K., Kenneth Earl, et al. “The howling monkeys, Genus Alouatta.” Ecology and Behavior of Neotropical Primates, edited by Russell A. Mittermeier et al., vol. 2, World Wildlife Fund, 1988, pp. 349–453. Open Access Copy

Clarke, Margaret R., Kenneth Earl, and K. E. Glander. “Female reproductive success in a group of free-ranging howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata) in Costa Rica.” Female Primates: Studies by Women Primatologists, edited by K. E. Small, M. and K. E. Liss, A. R., 1984, pp. 111–26. Open Access Copy

Glander, K. E. “Alouatta palliata.” Costa Rican Natural History, edited by Daniel H. Janzen, University Of Chicago Press, 1983, pp. 448–49. Open Access Copy

Glander, K. E. “Feeding patterns in mantled howling monkeys.” Foraging Behavior: Ecological, Ethological, and Psychological Approaches, edited by K. E. Kamil, A. and K. E. Sargent, T. D., Garland Press, 1981, pp. 231–59. Open Access Copy

Glander, K. E. “Howling monkey feeding behavior and plant secondary compounds: A study of strategies.” The Ecology of Arboreal Folivores, edited by Gerald Gene Montgomery, Smithsonian Inst Pr, 1978, pp. 561–73. Open Access Copy

Pages

Irwin, Mitchell T., et al. “Morphometric signals of population decline in diademed sifakas occupying degraded rainforest habitat in Madagascar..” Scientific Reports, vol. 9, no. 1, June 2019. Epmc, doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45426-2. Full Text

Fernandez-Duque, M., et al. “Darting Primates: Steps Toward Procedural and Reporting Standards.” International Journal of Primatology, vol. 39, no. 6, Dec. 2018, pp. 1009–16. Scopus, doi:10.1007/s10764-017-9963-z. Full Text Open Access Copy

Clayton, Jonathan B., et al. “Associations Between Nutrition, Gut Microbiome, and Health in A Novel Nonhuman Primate Model..” Scientific Reports, vol. 8, no. 1, July 2018. Epmc, doi:10.1038/s41598-018-29277-x. Full Text Open Access Copy

Clayton, Jonathan B., et al. “The gut microbiome of nonhuman primates: Lessons in ecology and evolution..” American Journal of Primatology, vol. 80, no. 6, June 2018. Epmc, doi:10.1002/ajp.22867. Full Text Open Access Copy

Thompson, Cynthia L., et al. “Thyroid hormone fluctuations indicate a thermoregulatory function in both a tropical (Alouatta palliata) and seasonally cold-habitat (Macaca fuscata) primate..” American Journal of Primatology, vol. 79, no. 11, Nov. 2017. Epmc, doi:10.1002/ajp.22714. Full Text Open Access Copy

Thompson, Cynthia L., et al. “An assessment of skin temperature gradients in a tropical primate using infrared thermography and subcutaneous implants..” Journal of Thermal Biology, vol. 63, Jan. 2017, pp. 49–57. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.jtherbio.2016.11.005. Full Text Open Access Copy

Thompson, C. L., et al. “Measuring Microhabitat Temperature in Arboreal Primates: A Comparison of On-Animal and Stationary Approaches.” International Journal of Primatology, vol. 37, no. 4–5, Oct. 2016, pp. 495–517. Scopus, doi:10.1007/s10764-016-9917-x. Full Text Open Access Copy

Clayton, Jonathan B., et al. “Captivity humanizes the primate microbiome..” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 113, no. 37, Sept. 2016, pp. 10376–81. Epmc, doi:10.1073/pnas.1521835113. Full Text Open Access Copy

Wallace, Gregory L., et al. “A comparison of activity patterns for captive Propithecus tattersalli and Propithecus coquereli..” Zoo Biology, vol. 35, no. 2, Mar. 2016, pp. 128–36. Epmc, doi:10.1002/zoo.21258. Full Text Open Access Copy

Spradley, Jackson P., et al. “Dust in the wind: How climate variables and volcanic dust affect rates of tooth wear in Central American howling monkeys..” American Journal of Physical Anthropology, vol. 159, no. 2, Feb. 2016, pp. 210–22. Epmc, doi:10.1002/ajpa.22877. Full Text Open Access Copy

Pages

Pampush, James D., et al. “Dental Topography and Food Processing in Wild-Caught Costa Rican Alouatta.” American Journal of Physical Anthropology, vol. 165, WILEY, 2018, pp. 198–198.

Connour, Jacqueline Runestad, et al. “Cancellous bone density in age-sorted atelines.” American Journal of Physical Anthropology, vol. 162, WILEY, 2017, pp. 340–340.

Laub, Emily C., et al. “Longitudinal body mass variation in wild primate populations: are individuals or populations more variable?.” American Journal of Physical Anthropology, vol. 159, WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2016, pp. 202–202.

Spradley, Jackson P., et al. “Environmental stress and molar wear in three populations of mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata).” American Journal of Physical Anthropology, vol. 153, WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2014, pp. 244–244.

Glander, Kenneth E., et al. “Circadian patterns for five species of lemurs at the Duke Lemur Center.” American Journal of Physical Anthropology, vol. 153, WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2014, pp. 125–125.

Thompson, Cynthia L., et al. “Too hot, too cold, or just right: Thermal challenges facing mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata) in a dry tropical forest..” American Journal of Physical Anthropology, vol. 150, WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2013, pp. 271–271.

Connour, Jacqueline A. Runestad, and Kenneth E. Glander. “Comparison of Alouatta male and female limb bone properties.” American Journal of Physical Anthropology, vol. 147, WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2012, pp. 254–55.

Ramsier, Marissa, et al. “Hearing sensitivity and the evolution of acoustic communication in platyrrhine monkeys.” American Journal of Physical Anthropology, vol. 147, WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2012, pp. 243–243.

Clayton, Jonathan B., et al. “Fecal bacterial diversity of the wild mantled howling monkey (Alouatta palliata)..” American Journal of Physical Anthropology, vol. 147, WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2012, pp. 116–17.

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